Inside the PMP® Question Writing Process


Mike Griffiths Southern Alberta Chapter

Mike Griffiths is a consultant and trainer who help organizations improve performance through shared leadership, agility and (un)common sense. He maintains the blog LeadingAnswers.com.

When you hear the words “PMP® exam,” what springs to mind?

If you already have the credential, then probably the study period and stress associated with obtaining it. If you’re thinking of taking the exam, then maybe some apprehension and anxiety. An effective way to reduce this anxiety is through learning about the exam goals and approach. Information is power, and it never hurts to be more aware of the process before taking the exam.

The Credential vs. the Exam

Obtaining the PMP credential requires more than just passing an exam. It also involves an assessment of education, project management experience and validation of project management education/training.

Discussing the relative merit of the PMP or the application process is outside the scope of this article. Anyone interested in learning more about the credential in general is advised to see the PMI website. Instead, we will focus on PMP exam questions for those interested in taking the exam. We will investigate how PMP exam questions are created and referenced to existing resources. Understanding the process can help anyone studying for the exam learn smarter and reduce stress—which can be a performance inhibitor.

Where do PMP Questions Come From?

The PMP exam is designed to test the application of generally accepted project management knowledge and skills. So to create valuable…

Please log in or sign up below to read the rest of the article.


ADVERTISEMENTS













“A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject.”


– Winston Churchill







Source link

Share this Post

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Leave a Reply

Close Menu